Announcements

  • The Art of Dental Finance with Art Wiederman Podcast

    This episode of The Art of Dental Finance includes a lot of great information about the overall dental profession, as well as oral surgery. Art spends the hour with Dr. Edward Balasanian, Orange County Oral Surgeon and President of the Orange County Dental Society.

    Ed is very involved in the California Dental Association and gives great insight into the challenges dentists face today, as well as what organized dentistry is doing to help its membership. Ed also talks about new trends in oral surgery, how oral surgeons bring value to their referrals, how they are helping patients manage pain and avoid addiction to opioids, and updates on implant surgery and sleep procedures. Be sure to listen in if you’d like to learn how to better manage and grow your dental practice.

  • Renew Your Membership Today!

    Get your OCDS, CDA and ADA membership set for 2020. Pay your dues and sign up for autopay by December 31 to receive a $10 Starbucks® gift card from CDA.*

    If you are already on autopay, your membership will automatically renew for 2020.

    * Limit one per person while supplies last. Terms and conditions apply. See full terms and conditions at cda.org/autopay.
  • Legislative victories for sugar-sweetened beverage bills

    Despite intense lobbying efforts by the soda industry, two bills that aim to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages that contribute to obesity, diabetes, tooth decay and heart disease have advanced in the Legislature. A CDA co-sponsored bill to end manufacturer discounts by SSB companies and a bill to require warning labels on sugar-sweetened beverages passed their first committee. A bill to enact a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages also passed in committee but has since been held. Assemblymember Jim Wood, DDS, (D-Santa Rosa) provided a strong message about the need for action to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Watch here.
  • ADA Statement on Study Involving Dental Floss

    January 14, 2019

    CHICAGO — Recent, wide-spread news coverage based upon a recent research study may raise unwarranted concern about the safety of certain types of dental floss. The ADA Science Institute finds the data insufficient to support the conclusions presented in this research and associated media coverage.  

    No restrictions on the use of dental floss have been issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the regulatory agency that oversees clearance of dental products marketed to the public. It is also important to bear in mind that this is a single study. Public health policy and safety decisions should be based on the collective weight of scientific evidence.

    The study, published in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology, involves a small sample of 178 women and their self-reported use of a wide array of consumer products and foods. 

    The study measured blood samples from 178 women and found that those who reported using a certain brand of dental floss had higher levels of a type of PFAS called PFHxS (perfluorohexanesulfonic acid) than those who didn't. 

    One of many shortcomings of this study, according to the ADA Science Institute, is that the study measured fluorine as a marker of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), though the women in the study who reported using a particular brand of floss were found to have elevated levels of PFHxS. 

    PTFE is often used in food and beverage, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic applications. The fact that the researchers were able to find the PTFE marker in several brands of floss does not mean that it is the source of the PFHxS in the women.  

    Given that this was a retrospective study including self-reported use of products, there are likely many other differences between women who did and did not report having used the brand of floss mentioned.

    The ADA sees no cause for concern based on current evidence, and above all continues to encourage people to clean between their teeth daily with floss or other interdental cleaner as part of the ADA’s daily oral hygiene recommendations.